Soundcloud Copyright Disputes Part 1

The following conversation recently took place between myself and the Soundcloud Copyright team, after I received the third copyright dispute about official remixes I had uploaded to their website. I’d just become a little bit annoyed that they were questioning my rights over the remixes at the same time my notifications were full of “unofficial” Brittany Spears and Justin Bieber remixes. Part 2 follows later.

soundcloudHi there, I’ve received messages from Soundcloud disputing 3 of my remixes and I’ve sent information to you about them, confirming that they are officially-approved tracks and given you the name of someone to contact at the label which commissioned me. I’m happy that you are checking up on “unofficial” tracks, but unless some other artist or listener is deliberately picking on my tracks, I’m concerned that you seem to be picking on small-timers like me with not many plays and followers, whilst continuing to allow thousands of other seemingly unofficial cover versions and remixes that rack up 1000’s of plays. Unless you are checking on every file that is uploaded, I fear that Soundcloud is heading for the wrath of the major labels in the same way that happened to Youtube, and we’ll all have ads splashed across our pages. Sorry if it sounds like a rant, but can you please explain your policy about uploading tracks and how many more times I may have to settle disputes on my official remixes.

The reply came a few hours later:

Hi Tim,

Thanks for writing in and for submitting this dispute. I can see that it has already been processed, and that the track is back on your profile.

Really sorry about this temporary inconvenience, and thanks for hanging in there while we fixed this problem.

At SoundCloud, we strive to ensure that everybody’s rights are respected. To help achieve this goal at scale, we work with a third-party content ID system that is the best in the market. What happened is that your track was flagged by our system as containing copyrighted content.

We understand that you have to take an additional step and fill out our dispute form to clear your sounds for uploading, and we’re sorry if this is an inconvenience, but we hope you’ll understand that it will help to keep your sounds safeguarded.

Thanks again for your patience,

SoundCloud Copyright Team

I didn’t leave it there, and decided to write back to them, which you can read here….

Continued….

 

Advertisements

I’ve learned to make an Android App

Yes, I’ve learned to make a Google Android App, using the Googlelabs App Inventor (beta)….

I’ve made my very first app for my Android phone! It’s not an all-singing, all-dancing program, but it’s an app, all the same. Why make an app? I’ve always wondered how to make an Android application for a while, and also wanted a way of making our College library induction leaflet available to more students, and making it instantly available and updatable. I recently found a couple of websites that you can pay to have an app developed for you, or make an app from an RSS feed fro free, but I wanted one where I could add content myself. I came across App Inventor for Android (beta), which is one of the gadgets on Google Labs. It looked just the thing I needed to make my own app.

The blurb on the website says:

Creating an App Inventor app begins in your browser, where you design how the app will look. Then, like fitting together puzzle pieces, you set your app’s behavior. All the while, through a live connection between your computer and your phone, your app appears on your phone

Android App Inventor Blocks Editor

(screenshot of the Blocks Editor)

The basic app that I made uses text-based lists and a basic navigation system to provide the content, and it’s even got a button that lets you dial the library’s phone number! I’ve so far added things like opening times and how many books you can borrow, but it’s a start. The App Inventor lets you add all sorts of complex programming, using drag and drop blocks that interlink, and updates the output via either an online phone emulator, or your own phone linked to the computer. It’s a great little program, and it’s got enough scope and complexity for me to add links to (and play) online induction videos, external content, and send updates to users’ phones, all using the same application.

One shortcoming of the Google Android App Inventor, is that you can’t, at the moment, add your self-made app to the Android market. You can, however, download it and share it with your friends and students.

Picture of Library App

(screenshot of the completed app).

This post was first made by me on Posterous.

QR Codes

I’ve just created a QR code to point people to another website…. you’ll have to have a QR code reader on your mobile phone to find out where it points to!  Just open your QR reader and point your mobile phone at the code:

qr codeI generated the code at QRDroid, as the one I’d orginally done at Kaywa’s QR Code Generator kept on disappearing. You can get a free code reader for Android phones at QR droid.

If you can’t wait, just click the image here to take you to the page….