Stephen Fry, blogging and musicians

Musicians and bands should take notice of Stephen Fry’s comments on BBC’s Analysis programme “Stephen Fry: The Internet and Me”. Fry points out that Twitter and its ilk have made it easy for celebs to bypass the press offices and gossip columnists, and tell the world what they’re doing as soon as it happens. Why though, are there not many bands and musicians on Twitter? Why aren’t there many bands from Manchester (UK) not tweeting that they’re doing a gig on Friday night? No DJs either, plugging their new set?

Mr Musician, it’s ok to have a Myspace page and add a new event, or go on Facebook and tell your followers when your CD is out, but do you use your Myspace blog to involve your fans (or potential fans) in your writing process, or post a comment on your FB wall to say you’ve finished another track? If you had a Twitter account, you could send update your fans on a regular basis: “someone from a record label was at the gig earlier tonight” – that sort of thing.

Surely you’re not waiting for manager to do it for you? If you’ve got a PR person, are they on Twitter, or Digg, or even blogging on your behalf? To me, a lot of bands – especially unsigned ones, are missing the boat. They’re not looking for new ways of promoting themselves. Yeah, they’re on Youtube, Bandcamp, Facebook, but everyone is. How many people read comments or blog posts on Myspace  these days? How do you know it’s not the record company’s PR department writing a post?

Think about Stephen Fry’s “Help, I’m stuck in a lift, but I’ve still got time to Twitter” tweet as an example of what I mean.  Stuff like Twitter just a great medium for keeping his fans and followers uptodate with what he’s doing: when his next TV programme is on, when he’s recording a podcast, and when he’s going to have a cup of tea. So many people, many of them are celebrities, have switched on to the self-publicity machine that is Twitter, especially in the UK. Jimmy Carr, Philip Schofield, Chris Moyles, Alan Carr – they may not be really famous and massive celebs, but they’ve all realised that their fans and potential fans read their Twitter posts. 

Mr Musician, Mr Band member, Mr DJ, Twitter et al let you build up your profile for your fans and let people know that you’re a real person, with real thoughts, not just a noise on a CD. Get Tweeting when you’ve finished a recording session, or when you’re getting a new guitar!

My daytime job is in e-learning in a further education college, and I’m amazed by the number of applications, websites, and other stuff I come across that could be used by bands to promote what they’re doing.

Don’t forget, this is just my opinion. If you want to know more about what I’m upto, why not follow me on Twitter!

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Using Soundcloud in WordPress

If you’re a Soundcloud user and want to play your tracks in your WordPress.com blog, here’s how to do it:  Just copy the link location from the “download” button on your soundcloud player and paste it into your WordPress visual editor (not the code editor). You need to add the usual WP code to it so you get, eg:

[a u d i o http://soundcloud.com/band/song/download]

Obviously, you’ll need no gaps in the word audio!

So it should look like this:

http://soundcloud.com/mistrust/pitch-black-rude-mechanicals-mistrust-remix/download

Publish your WP post and then view it. The standard WP flash player appears (the one with the speaker and the play icon).

You’d think that you would need a .mp3 extension, but you don’t! Also, you don’t get a Soundcloud player in your blog. Have a look here to see it in action properly:

https://mistrust.wordpress.com/music/

It works!

Thanks to Soundcloud.com for hosting my tracks.

PLEASE NOTE:

My blog has now moved to http://www.mistrustmusic.co.uk so please click the link to go there…

The world of mistrust music

Attention surfer dudes

I got an email yesterday saying that O’Neill, the surfing, skiing, and snowboarding company, have launched O’Neill TV, featuring all their promo films, profiles, and all sorts of other video footage. I thought it would actually be proper tv station on Sky or the Extreme Channel, but it turned out it’s just a glorified Flash player on their website. I’m not dismissing it though. It looks great, and there are loads of videos on there, especially for all you surf, ski, and snowboard types out there. Plus, it’s got me on there. Actually, it’s got my music on a couple of videos up there.

Three tracks – Croydon Library, Never Alone remix, and Hello – are on the Deep Blue Open 2005 event video, and two – Croydon Library and Never Alone – are on the video profile of Trent Munro (world-famous surfer dude).  I signed a non-exclusive deal with O’Neill Europe a couple of years ago, thinking that I’d just get a couple of DVDs from it, but I’m still getting exposure from it. I guess this O’Neill TV thing is getting a lot of hits, so more exposure for me.

You can play the two clips here:

Trent Munro Profile

Deep Blue Open 2005

Both of these clips show how well my music fit with a variety of visuals. Any film makers out there who need music for their latest project, please get in touch!!!!

All the world’s an MP3 stage

I’ve been thinking about the number of music hosting sites and MP3 directories that I have my music on. Most of them are free-to-download places where people can just have my tracks for nothing. I started off in late 2004 by choosing just one site – Electromancer.com, which is now no more, just because I lacked confidence about my music and it seemed like a good place to start when I’d never even considered putting my music out to the public. In fact, even though Electromancer closed down last year, a lot of the artists are still active on the forums of another site, Nervejam, and are still as friendly and supportive as ever.

I got a bit more confident after getting some great reviews, thinking that more people might give me a listen, so I followed links and recommendations about other hosting sites, signed up to 2 or 3, and waited for the plays to roll in. Then I started chasing more sites and more plays, until I had tracks on about 1o or 15 sites. I’ve now lost track (and usernames/passwords) of most of those sites, and still get the occasional email from them, saying someone has posted a comment. A quick check on google as to which sites I’m on offers up 94 links for “mistrust music site” and 30 for “never alone mistrust” (my first track from 2004).

I still see the same old faces on all these hosting sites,

Continue reading All the world’s an MP3 stage